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Article
May 1950

SIGNIFICANCE OF ANEMIA, LEUKOPENIA AND PEL-EBSTEIN FEVER IN HODGKIN'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

From the medical service of Prof. M. Roch, Hôpital Cantonal, Geneva, Switzerland.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;85(5):795-805. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230110070006
Abstract

DESPITE the passage of a hundred odd years since Hodgkin first interested himself in the disease which now bears his name, its etiologic agent is unknown, and the disease is still often one of the most trying diagnostic problems. The work of Greenfield1 and Reed2 accomplished much toward clarification of the diagnosis by histologic examination. More recently, Jackson and Parker3 on the basis of the pathologic picture, clinical symptomatology and prognosis have divided the disease into three categories: Hodgkin's paragranuloma, granuloma and sarcoma.

As diagnosis can be made only on histologic examination, cases in which there is primary involvement of the deeper structures present a serious diagnostic problem. The classic textbook picture of massive cervical or axillary adenopathy which may be accompanied with a hilar shadow is not always found; indeed in 10 to 30 per cent of cases there may be no involvement of superficial nodes.

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