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Article
September 1950

CLINICAL STUDIES WITH ACTH AND CORTISONE IN RENAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Physic, Harvard Medical School; Physician in Chief, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital; Research Fellow of the American Heart Association; Research Fellow in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital; Research Fellow in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital; Research Fellow in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital BOSTON

From the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and the Medical Clinic, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;86(3):319-354. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230150002001
Abstract

THE DEVASTATING effects of glomerular nephritis and the considerable disability induced by this disease are well known. The fact that nephritis has a predilection for children and young adults serves as an additional stimulus to the search for a means of controlling the disease. To date, therapy is limited to procedures which ameliorate the metabolic abnormalities secondary to renal failure or attempts to reduce the incidence of intercurrent infections. The dramatic effect which pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisone1 exert on the course of a wide variety of systemic diseases of unknown origin, especially those in which an antigen-antibody type of reaction is believed to play an important etiologic role, stimulated us to investigate the possible beneficial effect of these hormones in patients with glomerular nephritis. Furthermore, earlier studies 2 indicating an apparent competitive inhibition of cortisone on excessive sodium retention induced by desoxycorticosterone naturally suggested an investigation of

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