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Article
December 1950

PROGRESS NOTES ON FIFTY DIABETIC PATIENTS FOLLOWED TWENTY-FIVE OR MORE YEARS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the George F. Baker Clinic, Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., Medical Director, New England Deaconess Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1950;86(6):891-897. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230180096008
Abstract

FOREWORD  Between 1922 and 1929 in all our fatal cases of diabetes the average duration of life after onset was eight years. It ranged from 2.8 years for patients under 10 years of age to 9.5 years for those with onset between 40 and 59 years. Arteriosclerosis was even then recognized as important, and, therefore, we welcomed a study by Dr. H. C. Shepardson of this feature, especially in a series of 50 patients with onset under 40 years of age, who already had had diabetes five or more years, hoping that the eventual course of these patients could be followed and would disclose useful information.Below, Dr. Ruth Reuting has summarized the present status of this group. Not only did the patients in the series who died live more than twice as long, but the surviving patients lived more than three times as long as the average duration in

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