[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.185.157. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1950

ACTION OF ATROPINE ON THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM IN NORMAL PERSONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University School of Medicine, and the III Medical Service, St. Luke's Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1950;86(6):898-907. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230180103009
Abstract

THE MAJORITY of clinical observations indicate that attacks of angina pectoris are prone to occur during the fourth, fifth and sixth decades, and that they are relatively infrequent either prior to or after this period. The symptoms of angina pectoris result when the blood supply to the heart muscle is inadequate for its needs at that moment. Gilbert,1 in discussing vasomotor changes in the coronary arteries, called attention to the fact that this inadequate blood supply in many cases may be due completely, or in part, to anatomic changes in the vessels which render them unable to meet the increased demands that accompany the increased work of the heart, but he also stressed that a similar disproportion between the blood supply and demand will result if the vessels fail to increase in caliber in response to the increased needs, even though they may be anatomically intact. He stated that

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×