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Article
December 1950

STUDIES ON THE EFFECTS OF PARENTERAL QUINIDINE ADMINISTRATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the service of Julius Burstein, M.D., Department of Electrocardiography, Morrisania City Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1950;86(6):917-933. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230180122011
Abstract

THE NEED for parenteral quinidine therapy has long been recognized. Administration by the intramuscular or intravenous route is indicated in patients requiring this drug who are unable to take the preparation orally because of vomiting, shock or coma and in instances in which rapidity of effect is important.

Following Wenckebach's report1 in 1914 on the value of quinine in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and Frey's subsequent demonstration2 of the greater effectiveness of its dextroisomer, quinidine, various investigators have attempted to obtain a satisfactory parenteral preparation. In general, these solutions have been unsatisfactory because of their lack of stability. Recently, stable solutions of quinidine have become available.

We have studied the effects of quinidine lactate administered parenterally on 59 subjects divided into three groups. Group A consisted of 22 persons with normal hearts, group B of 15 with abnormal hearts (with regular sinus rhythm) and group C of

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