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Article
January 1951

RECESSION OF NEURORETINOPATHY DURING THE COURSE OF MALIGNANT HYPERTENSIONIts Occurrence in Fifteen Patients Who Did Not Receive Directed Therapy

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine (Dr. Keith) and the Section on Ophthalmology (Dr. Wagener), Mayo Clinic.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;87(1):25-47. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810010035004
Abstract

WE DESCRIBED in 19241 a clinical syndrome that occurred in a small group of patients who had had severe hypertension and neuroretinopathy. The further course of the disease was progressive, often rapidly fatal, and led us to apply the term syndrome of malignant hypertension to the condition. Our clinical and pathological studies suggested that the widespread involvement of many viscera was due to diffuse alterations in the arteriolar system.2 With increasing experience in subsequent cases, we 3 and others4 on rare occasions observed a patient in whom the disease appeared to be arrested and recession of the papilledema and of the retinopathy had occurred. Over a period of 20 years, we have seen the subsidence of the retinopathy in 15 patients and at the time of the observation were unable to offer a satisfactory explanation for this favorable turn of events.

Other investigators have reported recession of

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