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Article
March 1951

INTERMITTENT PERITONEAL LAVAGE IN NEPHRECTOMIZED DOGS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE HUMAN BEING

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Maurine Giese, William M. Ott and Gordon M. Gafford DALLAS, TEXAS

From the Department of Experimental Medicine, Southwestern Medical School of the University of Texas.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;87(3):379-390. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810030052005
Abstract

PREVIOUS studies on the use of artificial measures (the artificial kidney, exchange blood transfusions, peritoneal lavage, etc.) to maintain life in the absence of renal function have been carried out chiefly on the human patient. Thus, a total of 101 patients have been treated by continuous peritoneal lavage,1 but the value of the method remains equivocal because many patients with acute anuria recover spontaneously when treated by more conservative measures.2 It was deemed necessary, therefore, to carry out studies on the nephrectomized animal in order to establish the potentialities of the method before proceeding to its application to the human patient.

The present paper describes procedures for performing peritoneal lavage, by means of which it has been possible to maintain bilaterally nephrectomized dogs for periods of 30 to 70 days, which is several times that ever reported previously. With consideration of the inevitable malignant hypertension that develops following

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