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Article
June 1951

DETERMINATION OF SERUM PROTEIN-BOUND IODINE AS A ROUTINE CLINICAL PROCEDURE

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

From the Medical Service, Grady Memorial Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;87(6):817-824. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810060044005
Abstract

DURING the past few years studies of the serum protein-bound iodine (PBI) have proved its determination to be a valuable research tool; however, the complicated methods employed have made the use of this test impractical as a routine clinical laboratory procedure. The recent development of a simple alkaline ashing method which is suitable for the analysis of large numbers of specimens has made this determination available for routine use in medical practice. This technique has been used for the study of patients at Grady Memorial Hospital for the past year. As we have accumulated experience in the routine use of the serum protein-bound iodine determination, its advantages and disadvantages as a diagnostic aid have become increasingly evident. It, therefore, seemed worth while to report our experiences in some detail.

The entire subject of the blood iodine was recently reviewed from a theoretical viewpoint by Rapport and Curtis,1 and some

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