[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.204.161.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1951

LATE EFFECTS OF THORIUM DIOXIDE IN MAN

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;88(1):42-50. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810070052007
Abstract

THE USE of thorium dioxide in man has been controversial since its introduction in 1930.1 In the form of a colloidal suspension, thorium dioxide is a radiopaque diagnostic agent of greatest usefulness in visualizing the liver and spleen. Numerous observers have shown that this particulate material is taken up by the reticuloendothelial system after intravenous injection.2 The bulk of it is thus concentrated in the liver and spleen, which are then readily visible roentgenographically. In many patients it has been possible to demonstrate such lesions as liver abscesses and tumors without recourse to surgical measures.3 In this technique of hepatosplenography thorium dioxide is a unique agent.

Some observers have recognized potential dangers in the use of thorium dioxide, in view of its prolonged radioactivity and apparently permanent domicile in the body.4 In experimental animals it has been possible to produce malignant tumors with the use of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×