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Article
August 1951

EFFECTS OF "ARTISONE" ACETATE AND CORTISONE IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS

From the General Medicine and Arthritis Section of the Medical Service, Veterans Administration Medical Teaching Group, Kennedy Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;88(2):201-206. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810080069007
Abstract

IN THE SEARCH for substances which would induce remission of the symptoms and signs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a manner similar to that obtained with cortisone and corticotrophin (ACTH), Seifter and associates1 introduced "artisone" acetate (21-acetoxypregnenolone). These investigators observed the effect of several substances on the permeability of the synovial membrane of the ankle joints of rabbits.2 Measuring the interval which elapsed between the time of injection of phenolsulfonphthalein into the synovial cavity of the ankle joints in these animals and the time of appearance and concentration of the dye in the urine, they found that systemically administered hyaluronidase and desoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) markedly reduced this interval and increased the rate of concentration of the dye in the urine, while cortisone, corticotrophin, "artisone," and alarm reactions induced by colchicine decidedly increased this interval and decreased the concentration of the dye in the urine. They interpreted their

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