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Article
October 1951

BILATERAL ULNAR NERVE PALSY AS A RESULT OF PRESSURE PHENOMENA

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;88(4):512-514. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810100096010
Abstract

ISOLATED peripheral-nerve paralysis is common and is most frequently caused by trauma. Multiple peripheral nerve lesions, particularly when symmetrical, are generally ascribed to the effects of some toxin or systemic disease, such as alcoholism, diabetes, or a demyelinating process or virus infection of the central nervous system. In the case described in this report, our initial impression of the ulnar nerve palsy, which appeared bilaterally and simultaneously, was that we were dealing with a cervical lesion, either in the spinal cord or in the vertebral column. However, roentgenograms of the elbows revealed peculiar bony deformities. Their discovery led to the belief that in some manner they were connected with the appearance of the paralysis.

REPORT OF A CASE  The patient, a 25-yr.-old white man, was admitted in September, 1950, to the Veterans Administration Hospital, Bronx, N. Y. His complaints were numbness, tingling, weakness, and atrophy in the distribution of the

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