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Article
November 1951

ORAL USE OF CATION-EXCHANGE RESINS IN TREATMENT OF EDEMA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and the Medical Clinic, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1951;88(5):605-617. doi:10.1001/archinte.1951.03810110057006
Abstract

THE SUCCESSFUL use of cation-exchange resins in the treatment of edema in man first suggested by Dock1 has now been reported by several investigators.2 Their use in the form of an enema for the treatment of potassium intoxication has also been reported by Elkinton and associates.3 An excellent discussion of the mechanism of action and the many and varied uses of ion-exchange resins may be found in a monograph edited by Nachod.4

The purpose of the present report is to describe the use of cation-exchange resins for the removal of sodium via the intestinal tract in the treatment of edematous states and to define the advantages and limitations of this form of therapy. Both acute balance experiments showing the quantitative removal of cations in the feces and studies of the effects of prolonged administration (three months to two years) of these resins will be reported.

MATERIAL 

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