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Article
April 1952

CONTROL OF HYPERTENSION BY HEXAMETHONIUM AND 1-HYDRAZINOPHTHALAZINEPreliminary Observations

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Hypertension Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, under a Grant-in-Aid from the National Heart Institute, United States Public Health Service.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1952;89(4):523-540. doi:10.1001/archinte.1952.00240040002001
Abstract

SUCCESSFUL control at normotensive levels of the elevated blood pressure of human arterial hypertension theoretically should prevent or forestall all the secondary pathological changes resulting from increased arterial tension. There is, however, a wide body of opinion to the effect that hypertension, once established, is a disturbance necessary or "essential" for the maintenance of circulatory function. With this hypothesis I disagree. Sclerotic and narrowed coronary or cerebral arteries might become thrombosed when intra-arterial tension is lowered, especially if their respective arteriolar beds remain constricted; markedly inadequate renal blood flow may be lowered if renal blood vessels are sclerotic; but these conditions are not common to most cases of arterial hypertension.

A true antihypertensive drug of only moderate potency, 1-hydrazinophthalazine,1 was found to be considerably more effective in treatment of patients who had had an unsuccessful sympathectomy than in those suffering from uncomplicated hypertension.2 Malignant hypertension was also found

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