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Article
April 1952

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION IN ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

Author Affiliations

HINES, ILL.

From the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service and the Medical Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Hines, Ill.; Dr. Newman is Chief, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service; Miss Andrews, Assistant Chief, Physical Therapy Section; Dr. Baker, Chief, Medical Service.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1952;89(4):552-561. doi:10.1001/archinte.1952.00240040031004
Abstract

THERE has been much discussion concerning the management of acute myocardial infarction, and a vast amount of literature has accumulated on this subject. The greater part of this has been a consideration of various therapeutic agents which were or were not of benefit, and of the necessity of bed rest, as well as the time that ambulation should be started.

For the most part, opinion is fairly well crystallized regarding these matters; however, this condition brings into existence other factors which are worthy of consideration. While they do not materially affect mortality, they are vitally concerned with a smooth clinical course, the peace of mind of the patient, and the incidence of anxiety neurosis. All physicians treating acute myocardial infarction are aware of the importance of the following factors: (1) deconditioning during bed rest, with alterations in all physiologic processes; (2) the boredom and impatience created by the slow passage

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