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Article
May 1952

THE RATIONALE AND CLINICAL USE OF STEROID HORMONES IN CANCER

Author Affiliations

HAVERSTRAW, N. Y.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1952;89(5):812-852. doi:10.1001/archinte.1952.00240050126010
Abstract

D. Malignant Pelvic Growths  Next to carcinoma of the breast, uterine cancer ranks as the commonest malignant growth in females, since 23% of cancerous white women have the disease (Dorn). From birth to death the probability of a woman's having carcinoma of the uterus is 3.56% (Morris and Meigs). There are three to five times more cervical than endometrial (fundal, corpus) cancers (Nathanson, 1944a) and five living patients with the neoplasm for each patient who dies of uterine cancer (Ackerman and del Regato).

1. Endometrial Cancer.  —About 0.5% of women over 40 years old acquire endometrial cancer (Dorn), and the incidence is rising (Speert, 1948). The primary hope for cure includes a combination of radium therapy and surgical measures, with a five-year survival rate of 55 to 75% in operable cancers and 35 to 40% in cancers treated with radium and x-rays alone (Hertig and Sommers; Meigs, 1945; Palmer and

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