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Article
December 1952

STUDIES OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM METABOLISM IN SALT-LOSING NEPHRITIS

Author Affiliations

DETROIT; DEARBORN, MICH.; DETROIT

From the Departments of Medicine, Veterans Administration Hospital, Dearborn, Mich., and Wayne University College of Medicine, Detroit.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1952;90(6):750-762. doi:10.1001/archinte.1952.00240120025003
Abstract

SINCE THE term "salt-losing nephritis" was introduced by Thorn, Koepf, and Clinton1 in 1944, in their study of two cases simulating adrenal cortex insufficiency, four additional cases have been reported.2 An associated tendency toward excessive loss of potassium was found in one case,2c and electrocardiographic evidence of hyperpotassemia was seen in another.2d The present report is concerned with a case of salt-losing nephritis, followed for two years, in which sodium was lost and potassium was retained in excess quantities.

REPORT OF A CASE  J. B., a 30-year-old man, was first admitted to the hospital on June 19, 1950, with complaints of weakness for one year; periodic vomiting before breakfast and intermittent bleeding from the gums for three months, and occasional hematemesis, nocturia, paresthesia of hands and feet, and cramping of the calf muscles for six weeks. The patient was anorexic and had been vomiting frequently just prior to admission.This

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