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Article
May 1953

OVARIAN HILUS CELL (LEYDIG CELL) HYPERPLASIA ASSOCIATED WITH MASCULINIZATION

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.

From the Departments of Medicine, Gynecology, and Surgical Pathology, Medical College of Virginia and from the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Richmond, Va.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1953;91(5):675-684. doi:10.1001/archinte.1953.00240170101007
Abstract

OVARIAN tumors which are known to produce masculinization have usually been classified as arrhenoblastomas of the ovary, adrenal-like tumors of the ovary, and luteomas. The relationship of these tumors to each other, especially as regards histogenesis, morphology, and endocrine function, is a matter of continuing discussion, but these relationships remain unsettled. Teilum1 has emphasized the need for an improved histogenetic and morphologic classification of these and other functioning ovarian neoplasms.

Another ovarian lesion associated with virilization, namely, hyperplasia or tumor of ovarian hilus cells, has recently been studied by Sternberg2 and discussed by Schiller.3 The ovarian hilus cells have been called sympathicotropic cells, ovarian Leydig cells, ovarian interstitial cells, and extraglandular Leydig cells; they are morphologically indistinguishable from testicular interstitial cells of Leydig (which produce androgen in the male) and are considered to be a possible source of ovarian androgen.2

Cases of tumor of ovarian hilus cells have been reported

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