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November 1953

ORAL USE OF HYDROCORTISONE (COMPOUND F) IN TREATMENT OF SPRUE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Nutrition Clinic and the Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1953;92(5):615-627. doi:10.1001/archinte.1953.00240230015003
Abstract

THIS STUDY is concerned with the effects of hydrocortisone (compound F) in patients with intractable primary sprue. Two forms of this steroid were used, the acetate and the free alcohol. While hydrocortisone acetate proved ineffective, the free alcohol of hydrocortisone, given orally, was found to be a valuable therapeutic agent in the management of these patients. The study represents an extension of our previous observations on the effects of corticotropin and cortisone acetate in sprue.1

SELECTION OF PATIENTS  The diagnosis of primary sprue was based on the typical symptoms and signs of this disorder, namely, diarrhea and steatorrhea, weakness, considerable weight loss, soreness of mouth and tongue, anemia, and polyavitaminosis; the condition was associated in some instances with hypocalcemia, tetany, osteoporosis, and hypoproteinemia. In none of these patients was there evidence of pancreatic disease, and results of pancreatic enzyme studies, when performed, proved to be essentially normal. Roentgen studies

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