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Article
December 1953

OBSERVATIONS OF GASTRIC MOTILITY DURING GASTRIC CRISIS

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.

From the Department of Radiology, Duke Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1953;92(6):920-925. doi:10.1001/archinte.1953.00240240156012
Abstract

THE PROBLEM of syphilis involving the stomach itself has been well covered in the literature. There is no typical x-ray picture. A gumma in the pyloric region may simulate pyloric stenosis or may appear to be an ulcer or a new growth. An infiltrating lesion of the wall closely resembles and cannot from a single study be separated from an infiltrating tumor. The commonest finding, however, is the hourglass deformity of the stomach.1

Visceral attacks occur in 10% of persons suffering from tabes dorsalis. They may constitute an initial symptom and often occur in the preataxic stage; however, they are usually accompanied by pupillary signs or infection in the blood or spinal fluid.

Of the visceral crises the gastric type is commonest. The onset generally is featured by abrupt epigastric pain followed by retching and vomiting. Neither the pain nor the vomiting disappears with these ejections, and they may

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