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Article
January 1954

USE OF ARTIFICIAL KIDNEY IN CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.; MOUNT KISCO, N.Y.; MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY

From the Surgical Research Unit, Brooke Army Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954;93(1):61-74. doi:10.1001/archinte.1954.00240250071006
Abstract

EVEN UNDER ideal circumstances the management of patients who have chronic renal insufficiency is extremely difficult, and attempts to arrest the inexorable course have, in general, met with little success.

In recent years, efficient and more hemodialyzers have been devised,* and widespread interest has centered around their use in many conditions,† including the syndrome of chronic uremia.‡ When hemodialysis is used in the treatment of chronic uremia, blood levels of accumulated metabolites are reduced, blood electrolyte concentrations frequently return to normal, and clinical improvement occurs in most cases. The accomplishment of these effects, regardless of the method of dialysis employed, is only a partial therapeutic approach to the problem involved in the treatment of these patients. However, as has been pointed out,§ this method of therapy may have definite value in the management of selected cases of chronic renal insufficiency.

In an effort to assess the efficacy of the artificial

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