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Article
June 1954

ACQUIRED HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA ASSOCIATED WITH HEMOCHROMATOSIS

Author Affiliations

VANCOUVER, CANADA

From the Department of Pathology, Vancouver General Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954;93(6):977-981. doi:10.1001/archinte.1954.00240300171017
Abstract

THE COEXISTENCE of acquired hemolytic anemia and hemochromatosis has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Recently, however, a case of congenital hemolytic anemia and hemachromatosis has been described.1

It is important to differentiate between hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis. Hemosiderosis is the excessive deposition of hemosiderin in the tissues, due to several possible causes. Hemochromatosis is a rare, chronic, progressive disorder of iron metabolism, characterized in the early stage by an abnormal deposition of hemosiderin in the skin and viscera, followed by fibrosis of the liver and pancreas and, in the fully developed case, the presence of diabetes mellitus. Hemosiderosis may result from transfusions, administration of intravenous iron, or excessive breakdown of red blood cells in hemolytic anemias. Hemochromatosis is an idiopathic condition, and it is a moot point as to whether transfusions or diet may be the cause of certain instances.*

The case presented fulfills the above criteria for

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