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Article
October 1954

POSTPRANDIAL SERUM AMINO ACID LEVELS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of California and Wadsworth Hospital, Veterans Administration Center; Assistant Professor of Medicine (Dr. Mellinkoff) and Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology (Dr. Jenden).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1954;94(4):604-611. doi:10.1001/archinte.1954.00250040096008
Abstract

IT HAS long been known that the liver plays a major role in the metabolism of amino acids.* It is not surprising, therefore, that abnormally high concentrations of amino acids have been found in the blood of patients with acute yellow atrophy of the liver.2 The fasting blood amino acid concentration is rarely altered by liver injury less severe than acute or subacute yellow atrophy or some comparable catastrophe.† Individual amino acids, however, may be elevated in less severe hepatic disease.3 In normal persons, after a high-protein meal the blood amino acid level rises,4 as does the blood sugar in a glucose-tolerance test, and one might expect that this postprandial amino acid curve would be higher and more prolonged in patients with liver disease. But data bearing upon this hypothesis are scanty. Kinsell and his co-workers have demonstrated an abnormally high blood methionine level in patients with

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