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Article
January 1955

SCLERODERMAPulmonary and Skin Studies Before and After Treatment with Cortisone

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Departments of Inhalation Therapy and Diseases of the Skin, Boston City Hospital, and the Departments of Medicine and Dermatology and Syphilology, Tufts College Medical School; Research Fellow in Medicine, Tufts College Medical School; Chief Resident, Department of Inhalation Therapy, Boston City Hospital (Dr. Salomon); Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, Tufts College Medical School; Physician-in-Chief for Diseases of the Skin, Boston City Hospital (Dr. Appel); Former Resident, Department of Diseases of the Skin, Boston City Hospital (Dr. Dougherty); Assistant in Medicine, Tufts College Medical School (Dr. Herschfus); Clinical Professor of Medicine, Tufts College Medical School; Director, Department of Inhalation Therapy, Boston City Hospital (Dr. Segal).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1955;95(1):103-111. doi:10.1001/archinte.1955.00250070119014
Abstract

GENERALIZED scleroderma is recognized as a disseminated disease which may involve not only the skin but many other organs. It is usually a chronic illness with a gradual downhill progression and lasts from months to years.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS  The course of scleroderma can be divided into two phases: the first is characterized by Raynaud-like phenomena; the second is initiated by the appearance of constitutional symptoms, including malaise, myalgia, and arthralgia and later is characterized by the development of visceral manifestations. These later phenomena result from the structural and functional derangements consequent to the degeneration of parenchymal cells and the simultaneous proliferation of connective tissue, in such diverse systems as skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, tendon and fascia, bones, blood vessels, serous surfaces, internal organs, endocrine glands, and the nervous system. These widespread and continuing alterations, resulting at least in part from the proliferation of fibrous tissue, have led Goetz 1 to

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