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Article
January 1955

FUNGOUS DISEASES

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

Director, Department of Pathology, Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans, and Clinical Professor of Pathology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine (Dr. Moss); Pathologist, Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., and Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine (Dr. McQuown); Assistant Pathologist, Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans (Dr. Cooke).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1955;95(1):153-172. doi:10.1001/archinte.1955.00250070169021
Abstract

FUNGOUS diseases world wide. A knowledge of the mycoses, of their signs ans symptoms, and of correct treatment is vital for the modern clinician. He is the person who considers them in the differential diagnosis. The definitive diagnosis can only be accomplished in the pathological laboratory. It is imperative that an accurate diagnosis be made, as the treatment varies with each etiologic agent and specific therapy is now available for many of these diseases. This exhibit presents and summarizes the principal points of the diseases produced by the pathologenic fungi.

METHODS OF DIAGNOSIS 

  • CLINICAL SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS (MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL)

    • AGE INCIDENCE

    • SEX INCIDENCE

    • LOCATION OF LESIONS

    • DURATION OF LESIONS

    • APPEARANCE OF LESIONS

    • OCCUPATIONAL HISTORY

    • GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION (IMPORTANT IN SOME INFECTIIONS)

  • LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS

    • DIRECT EXAMINATION (PUS, EXUDATES AND SCRAPINGS) STAINED AND UNSTAINED WET MOUNTS, SIMPLEST-MOST IMPORTANT.

    • CULTURAL METHODS. NECESSARY FOR DEFINITIVE DIAGNOSIS.

    • HISTOLOGICAL EXAMINATION. GRANULOMATOUS CHANGES, SPORES OR COLONIES OF FUNGI MAY BE PRESENT

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