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Article
January 1955

EVIDENCE FOR RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SODIUM (CHLORIDE) INTAKE AND HUMAN ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION

Author Affiliations

1450 Bryant Ave., Bronx, N. Y.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1955;95(1):173. doi:10.1001/archinte.1955.00250070189022

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —I wish to call your attention to a few statements made by Dahl and Love in relation to the frequency of hypertension among "low, average, and high" salt intaking groups of people (October, 1954, issue of the Achives), viz.:

  • While hypertension (in its essential form) among certain "primitive" ethnic groups could owe its rarity to their low salt intake, such an explanation can hardly hold for the Quechua and Aymara Indians of the South American Altiplano, among whom I practiced for many, many years; their salt intake is rather high, but their percentage of hypertensives (and, curiously enough, of gastric carcinoma, too) is very low. On the other hand, we should not forget that the Eskimos ingest a highly (albeit intrinsically) salted food: their staple food is represented by sea fish, whale, etc.—all animals with a high amount of salt in their tissues, as has been shown

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