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Article
July 1956

TREATMENT OF ADDISON'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Medical Clinic, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (Senior Associate in Medicine), and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School (Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1956;98(1):100-105. doi:10.1001/archinte.1956.00250250106014
Abstract

ONE HUNDRED years has elapsed since Thomas Addison published his epochal report "On the Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules."1 The remarkable progress of medical science in the past century is in no way better exemplified than by the advances that have been made in our knowledge of the effects and the treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Although there is still much to be learned of the normal and pathological physiology of the adrenal glands, from the practical viewpoint of therapy their destruction or removal no longer presents a danger to life or even to normal health.

These advances have been made possible by a remarkable series of collaborative enterprises among biochemists, physiologists, and physicians during the past 30 years. Prior to this era of collaboration attention had been directed principally to the development of extracts of adrenal glands to provide replacement therapy. Sir William Osler,

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