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Article
September 1957

Radiation and the Medical Profession

Author Affiliations

National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, Bethesda 14, Md.

From the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1957;100(3):347-352. doi:10.1001/archinte.1957.00260090003001
Abstract

Some months ago the statement which appears after Dr. J. E. Rail's editorial was received from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, set up by the General Assembly. It was felt that the statement, while extremely useful, was not as specific as might be desired to be of maximum practical value to our readers. It is therefore published in conjunction with Dr. Rail's informative and disturbing editorial

P. S. R.

The recent statement by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, which is reproduced, in part, with this editorial, and the recent action of the National Committee on Radiation Protection, which suggested another decrease in the "permissible" amount of radiation, illustrates the concern of scientists about the hazards of radiation. As indicated by the United Nations Committee statement, physicians, at least in the United States, are responsible for the major portions

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