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Article
February 1958

An Analysis of Five Hundred Percutaneous Renal Biopsies

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Departments of Medicine, Pathology, and Urology of the University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the Departments of Medicine of the Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, Cook County Hospital, and the Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois. Professor of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Attending Physician, Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois and Cook County Hospital, and Associate Attending Physician, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital (Dr. Kark). Instructor in Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Associate Attending Physician, Cook County Hospital; Research Assistant and Assistant Attending Physician, Outpatient Staff, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital (Dr. Muehrcke). Instructor in Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and Research Fellow, Department of Medicine, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital (Dr. Pollak). Professor of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine (Dr. Pirani). Associate Professor of Surgery and Head, Division of Urology, University of Illinois College of Medicine (Dr. Kiefer).

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1958;101(2):439-451. doi:10.1001/archinte.1958.00260140271038
Abstract

No matter how important are new discoveries and methods, they cannot be considered to have reached fulfilment until generally applied to the sick.

W. B. Castle, 1939*

The development of a safe 7 and relatively simple method of doing percutaneous renal biopsies has provided the physician and the clinical investigator with a new and useful tool for the study of renal diseases.7,8 Elsewhere we have discussed in some detail its value to the patient and the physician.9 By its use, exact histologic diagnoses can be made which provide a sound background for etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. The procedure has also been used to obtain cultures of organisms from infected kid- neys; to study, by serial biopsies, the natural history of diseases involving the kidney; to study reversible diseases of the organ, and to assess the effects of drugs on renal and cardiovascular diseases.10-21

Renal biopsies have

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