[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.120.181. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1958

Idiopathic Hypoparathyroidism

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Medicine, Michael Reese Hospital.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1958;101(6):1143-1146. doi:10.1001/archinte.1958.00260180133014
Abstract

Hypoparathyroidism is most commonly encountered after thyroidectomy when the parathyroid glands are inadvertently removed or damaged. Spontaneous or idiopathic hypoparathyroidism is rare. The first case was described by Falkenheim and Beumer, in 1926.1 Lachmann2 collected 70 cases between 1926 and 1939. Dietrich3 reported 113 cases in the world literature up to 1952. However, because some of these cases were not positively substantiated by records and because rigid criteria for the diagnosis were not applied, Steinberg and Waldron 4 reinvestigated the literature. They identified only 52 cases, with an additional case of their own if the following criteria were followed: (1) low serum calcium level, (2) high serum inorganic phosphorus level, (3) absence of renal insufficiency, (4) normal bones on x-rays, (5) chronic tetany. Albright5 recognized the occurrence of a separate form of idiopathic hypoparathyroidism designated as pseudohypoparathyroidism when he found that these patients failed to respond

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×