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Article
June 1958

Medical Support of the Army Air Forces in World War II.

Author Affiliations

U. S. A. F.

 

By Mae Mills Link and Hubert A. Coleman. Price, $7. Pp. 1027, with 52 figures, 19 charts, and 97 tables. Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1955.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1958;101(6):1176-1177. doi:10.1001/archinte.1958.00260180166028

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Abstract

This extremely accurate and detailed book does what its authors intended of it—it fills "a gap in the medical history of that period."

After a concise summary of "Aviation Medicine" from the establishment of the Aeronautical Division of the Army, in 1907, to the onset of World War II, efforts of the few flight surgeons then trained are set forth, and their tribulations, stymies, and achievements are aired.

Few were in a position to survey that world-wide scene of medical activities. We knew details of our niche and little of the problems of those ten thousand miles away or at a nearby air base.

Individual theaters of war are considered in turn, and the medical support problems, detailed. Ingenuity almost beyond human capability was displayed everywhere.

Air evacuation; paramedic activities; air-sea rescue; pressurized cockpits; demand oxygen systems; escape procedure; ditching procedure; arctic, jungle, and desert survival; definitive treatment at or

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