August 1958

The Springs of Virginia.

Author Affiliations

Third edition. By Perceval Reniers. Price, not given. Pp. 301, with illustrations. University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N. C., 1955.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1958;102(2):339. doi:10.1001/archinte.1958.00260200167027

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To those who have had the good fortune to visit Hot Springs or the White Sulphur Springs in the Virginias it will be no great surprise that these outstanding resorts are all that remains of a flourishing culture which reached a peak perhaps a hundred years ago and dwindled after the Civil War. Probably the Civil War was only a minor factor in the decline and decay of the Virginia spas. Some people today believe that the spring resorts of the mountains will come back into their own when the current cult of sunburned nudity at the beach dies out, as all cults have a way of doing. There seems to be no evidence that this trend is weakening notably at the moment. But as James Baker and others have pointed out so skillfully, the main reason for the flourishing of the springs at a time when Virginia included what

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