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Article
October 1959

Greek and Latin in Scientific Terminology.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1959;104(4):678. doi:10.1001/archinte.1959.00270100164038

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Abstract

Prof. Nybakken, chairman of the Department of Classics of the State University of Iowa, for many years has taught a class in scientific Latin and Greek, giving prospective medical and professional students an opportunity to learn in a relatively painless but none-the-less effective way the rudiments of word origins and of word formation. This excellent book, "Greek and Latin in Scientific Terminology," while it is not designed specifically for medical students or physicians, contains all the information necessary for a person who wishes to explore the mysteries of scientific nomenclature and learn the ground rules under which the words have developed. For instance, few of us realize that the position of the accent on the word thymos can make it mean either a warty excrescence or the soul.

Any physician or scientist interested in words and writing will welcome a book that even the novice may use as a primer

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