[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.65.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1960

Congenital Cardioaortic Fistula

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Department of Medicine, Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, and Bailey Thoracic Clinic, Philadelphia.; Dr. Brest is Chief Medical Resident, Bailey Thoracic Clinic, Philadelphia, and Fellow in Cardiology, Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Philadelphia; Dr. Nichols is Acting Head and Professor of Thoracic Surgery, Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Philadelphia, and Surgeon, Bailey Thoracic Clinic, Philadelphia, and Dr. Uricchio is Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Philadelphia, and Cardiologist, Bailey Thoracic Clinic, Philadelphia.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1960;105(2):298-300. doi:10.1001/archinte.1960.00270140120012
Abstract

A communication between the aorta and the heart may be either acquired or congenital in origin. The aortic opening usually arises from an aortic sinus of Valsalva and the cardiac end of the fistula usually enters the right ventricle; however, less commonly, the fistula may empty into the right atrium or left ventricle. According to the excellent review of Morgan Jones and Langley,1 the communication is acquired in approximately 75% of cases, and usually results from rupture of an aortic sinus aneurysm.

Congenital cardioaortic fistulae, on the other hand, are quite uncommon, but important because of the problems in differential diagnosis which they present. The purpose of this article is to describe a case report of this unusual anomaly, and to discuss its diagnosis and management.

Case Report  The patient, a 20-year-old white woman, was discovered to have a heart murmur at birth. However, she had a normal growth

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×