June 1960

Hypnosis in Modern Medicine.

Author Affiliations

Second edition. Edited by Jerome M. Schneck, M.D. Price, $8.75. Pp. 389. Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 301-327 E. Lawrence Ave., Springfield, Ill., 1959.

AMA Arch Intern Med. 1960;105(6):977-978. doi:10.1001/archinte.1960.00270180155025

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A number of physicians whose judgment I respect have said that hypnotism helps some sick patients. Reports appear sporadically. Recently, for instance, Conn has found that hypnosis sometimes relieves pain in cancer. Obstetricians have often used this technique with success. Despite this, few internists use hypnosis, and psychiatrists, like Freud, seem to have rejected the technique. Indeed, hypnosis may be of more value to internists than psychiatrists, since the latter believe it better to expose emotional problems. I read this book with interest, for we all use suggestion in treatment whether we recognize it or not. The editor has tried to produce an up-to-date volume of facts about the use of hypnosis in various specialities. The eleven contributors include an internist, an obstetrician, an anesthesiologist, and a dentist. The book is interesting but not entirely satisfactory. The editor almost succeeds, like a child reciting the alphabet but stopping at Q.

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