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Article
December 1960

The Physiology and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer.

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Edited by J. Garrott Allen, M.D. Price, $7.50. Pp. 236, with numerous illustrations. The University of Chicago Press, 5750 Ellis Ave., Chicago 37, 1959.

Arch Intern Med. 1960;106(6):897-898. doi:10.1001/archinte.1960.03820060149022

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Abstract

Books are written each year on some facet of peptic ulceration of the stomach. In most of these much space is devoted to gastric acid secretion, the part that this substance plays in the genesis and the perpetuation of peptic ulcer, and to methods designed to combat the deleterious effects of acid on the stomach and its ulcer. This, in spite of the fact that acid has yet to be proven to produce ulcer. The Physiology and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer does nothing to derail our thinking from the classic track. The front of the flyleaf contains Dr. Lester R. Dragstedt's well-known statement that duodenal ulcers are due to hypersecretion of gastric juice in the empty stomach dependent upon excessive and abnormal vagal impulses. Considerable discussion is given the part that excessive gastric antral activity plays in the etiology of gastric peptic ulcer. At the time of Dr. Dragstedt's recent

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