[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1961

Therapy of Hypoplastic Anemia with Bone Marrow Transplantation

Author Affiliations

USN; BOSTON

From the Blood Research Laboratory, Pratt Diagnostic Clinic-New England Center Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine.; Formerly a Research Fellow in Hematology, Blood Research Laboratory, New England Center Hospital, presently at U.S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Md. (CDR McFarland); formerly a Research Fellow in Hematology, Blood Research Laboratory, New England Center Hospital, presently at St. Francis Hospital, Hartford, Conn. (Dr. Granville); Research Associate in Hematology, Blood Research Laboratory, New England Center Hospital, under tenure of a U.S. Public Health Service Fellowship No. HF-7166(C) (Dr. Schwartz); Research Fellow in Hematology, Blood Research Laboratory, New England Center Hospital, under tenure of a U.S. Public Health Service Fellowship No. CF-9754 (Dr. Oliner); Senior Research Fellow in Hematology, Blood Research Laboratory, New England Center Hospital (Dr. Misra); Director, Blood Research Laboratory, New England Center Hospital, Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine (Dr. Dameshek).

Arch Intern Med. 1961;108(1):23-33. doi:10.1001/archinte.1961.03620070025004
Abstract

The therapy of hypoplastic anemia may be said to be far from satisfactory. In addition to blood transfusions, numerous measures have been tried, including corticotropin (ACTH) and the corticosteroids,1 cobalt,2 testosterone,3 and splenectomy.4 In some cases, one or another of these measures proves to be beneficial, but in most, few if any lasting effects are noted. During the past 3 years our laboratory has been investigating the use of bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic measure in this disease. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of this study.

Materials and Methods 

Patient Material.—  Thirty-seven cases of hypoplastic anemia were observed. All patients under study had a disorder characterized by: (1) severe pancytopenia, (2) hypoplasia of the bone marrow with at least 50% replacement of the normal marrow hematopoietic cells by fat, (3) the absence of splenomegaly, and (4) the absence of other

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×