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Article
December 1961

Long-Term Anticoagulant Therapy After Acute Myocardial InfarctionA Retrospective Study Based upon a Nine-Year Experience at The University of Chicago

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago.; Present address: U.S. Naval Hospital, in U.S.S. Haven (A.H.-12), U.S. Naval Station, Long Beach 2, Calif. (Dr. Kuhn); Suite 418, Unity Building, Bloomington, Ill. (Dr. Van Ness).; Formerly Resident, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Clinics, presently Associate Medical Director, State Farm Insurance Company, Bloomington, Ill. (Dr. Van Ness); formerly Resident, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Clinics, presently serving with the Medical Corps, U.S. Navy (Dr. Kuhn); Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Biological Sciences and University of Chicago Clinics (Dr. Jones); Professor of Medicine, Division of Biological Sciences and University of Chicago Clinics (Dr. Bay).

Arch Intern Med. 1961;108(6):884-896. doi:10.1001/archinte.1961.03620120068010
Abstract

The unpredictable nature of the clinical illness caused by coronary atherosclerosis makes evaluation of the therapy of this disorder very difficult. Since the time interval between the onset of symptoms and death may vary from a few seconds to over 20 years, it is impossible to draw definite conclusions about the effect of treatment unless large groups of patients are studied. While the value of anticoagulant administration during the first few weeks after an acute myocardial infarction has been amply demonstrated,1-3 there is lack of agreement as to the indications for continuing and ultimately for discontinuing long-term anticoagulant therapy after recovery. Because of the tremendous investment in time, money, and effort required of the patient, the doctor, and the laboratory for the successful prosecution of long-term anticoagulant therapy, any contribution toward our appreciation of its benefits and limitations is worthwhile. Because of the frequency of this disease, even a

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