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Article
April 1962

L.E. Cell Phenomenon in Acute HepatitisReport of Case with Comments on the Role of Autoimmunity in Liver Disease

Author Affiliations

BETHESDA, MD.

U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation (Dr. Schenker, Dr. Nasou); U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Pathologic Anatomy Branch (Dr. Lasersohn).

Arch Intern Med. 1962;109(4):447-457. doi:10.1001/archinte.1962.03620160073010
Abstract

Since 1955 when Joske and King1 first reported the presence of positive lupus erythematosus (L.E.) tests in 2 patients with active chronic hepatitis, the number of such reports has multiplied.2-7 The subject was discussed further in 1956 and 1959 by Mackay et al.,8,9 who described a series of patients with "active chronic hepatitis" who manifested some of the signs and symptoms seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (S.L.E.) as well as the L.E. cell phenomenon on one or more occasions. The similarity of this syndrome to systemic lupus erythematosus has prompted them to label it "lupoid hepatitis."

This description of the L.E. phenomenon and systemic manifestations similar to those seen with S.L.E. in patients with active, chronic liver disease has evoked considerable interest in the immunologic significance of protracted hepatic injury. In an attempt to further the understanding of this subject, we are presenting a report which deals

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