[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1962

Myoglobinuria and Hypokalemia in Regional Enteritis

Author Affiliations

SYRACUSE, N.Y.; BOSTON; LOUISVILLE, KY.

From the departments of Medicine, Pratt Clinic-New England Center Hospital and the Tufts University School of Medicine.; Formerly Senior Resident in Medicine, Pratt Clinic-New England Center Hospital (Dr. Heitzman); Physician-Chief of Gastroenterology Service, Pratt Clinic-New England Center Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine (Dr. Patterson); Professor of Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine; formerly Associate Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine and physician, Pratt Clinic-New England Center Hospital (Dr. Stanley).

Arch Intern Med. 1962;110(1):117-124. doi:10.1001/archinte.1962.03620190119019
Abstract

The occurrence of gross myoglobinuria in man is unusual though it has been reported in a number of circumstances. Most instances have involved either muscle injury or an undefined state in which there is recurrent myoglobinuria often after exercise. In the case to be reported here, myoglobinuria occurred in a setting of metabolic abnormalities induced by regional enteritis and its treatment with cortisone. The clinical and laboratory data suggest that exercise of muscles weakened by potassium and other deficiencies was the cause of the myoglobinuria.

Report of a Case  A 47-year-old civil engineer was referred to the Pratt Clinic on Oct. 22, 1953, for evaluation of regional enteritis. Six years previously, he had begun to have persistent abdominal pain and aching in various joints. One year later, in 1948, at a celiotomy, 20 cm. of the terminal ileum and the ileocecal valve were found to be indurated and inflamed. The

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×