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Article
August 1962

Coexistent Addison's Disease and Thyrotoxicosis

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

Director of Medicine, Knickerbocker Hospital; Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, New York University College of Medicine (Dr. Bruno).; Associate Attending Physician (Endocrinology), Knickerbocker Hospital; Assistant Professor of Medicine, New York University College of Medicine (Dr. Epstein).; From the Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Knickerbocker Hospital and the Departments of Medicine and Therapeutics, New York University College of Medicine.; Attending Physician (Endocrinology) and Director of Endocrine Clinic, Knickerbocker Hospital; Associate Professor of Medicine, New York University College of Medicine (Dr. Kupperman).; Director of Laboratories, Knickerbocker Hospital; Instructor in Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; Assistant Professor of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Dr. Ober).

Arch Intern Med. 1962;110(2):155-161. doi:10.1001/archinte.1962.03620200015004
Abstract

The coexistence of Addison's disease and thyrotoxicosis in the same individual is a medical rarity. Critical review of the literature reveals only 12 adequately documented instances1-11 of this association. Chronologic study of these cases mirrors the steady increase in our understanding of endocrine diseases at the bedside and the development of newer techniques in the laboratory.

The first 4 reported cases1-4 were all rapidly fatal, and the diagnosis of adrenocortical atrophy and thyroid hyperplasia was made at autopsy in 3 of them.1,3,4 The first successfully treated case was reported by Perera and Parker.5 All subsequently reported cases were treated successfully except for one of the 2 adequately documented cases reported by Houston and Price (Case 3).6 Two patients4,8 had developed diabetes mellitus less than 5 years before the onset of thyrotoxicosis; they developed Addison's disease subsequently. Another patient11 developed mild thyrotoxicosis 3

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