September 1963

Advances in Biology of Skin: Vol II. Blood Vessels and Circulation.

Author Affiliations

Edited by William Montagna and Richard A. Ellis. Price, $10. Pp 156, with many illustrations. Pergamon Press, Inc., 122 E 55th St, New York 22, 1961.

Arch Intern Med. 1963;112(3):446-447. doi:10.1001/archinte.1963.03860030200038

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Circulation of the skin is of unique interest. The skin is easily looked at and sometimes seen. It can be studied with a capillary microscope. The temperature can be measured readily. But most of all it is interesting because the skin is so important in regulation of the temperature. Blood flow to the skin, especially in the extremities, can increase more than a hundredfold above the very modest amount required to supply the metabolic needs of the skin. This book is eclectic and selective in its choice of topics and does not make an effort to deal comprehensively with circulation of the skin. It begins with the cutaneous vascular patterns, mostly as indicated by India ink injections, which are used to illustrate the relationship of the vascular patterns to nonvascular structures such as hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and sweat glands, both eccrine and apocrine. Further details are worked out by

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