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Article
January 1968

The Carcinoid Syndrome and Hypertension

Author Affiliations

Washington, DC

From the Department of Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital and Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Doctor Rosenberg is now with the Public Health Service, NAMRU-2, Taipei, Taiwan.

Arch Intern Med. 1968;121(1):95-96. doi:10.1001/archinte.1968.03640010097017
Abstract

The malignant carcinoid syndrome has been associated both drome has been associated both with spontaneous hypotension1 and epinephrine-induced hypotension.2 The epinephrine provocative test is considered positive when hypotension accompanies other carcinoid symptoms. A hypertensive response to intravenous epinephrine is generally considered a negative test, implying that the patient does not have a malignant carcinoid tumor.3

The purpose of this paper is to present a patient with the malignant carcinoid syndrome who sought medical attention for hypertension and who had a hypertensive response to intravenous epinephrine. This case, and previous reports,4-14 indicate that hypertension as well as hypotension can be associated with the carcinoid syndrome.

Patient Summary  A 51-year old Negro man, was admitted to Georgetown University Hospital for abdominal pain of nine months' duration. He initially sought medical attention three years prior to admission because of flushing. While shaving, he observed his face was "redder than

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