January 1969

Illustrated Manual of Laboratory Diagnosis.

Author Affiliations

USA Washington, DC


By R. Douglas Collins, MD. Price, S22.50. Pp 280, with 10 figures, 4 tables, and 195 color plates. J. B. Lippincott Co., E Washington Sq, Philadelphia 19105, 1968.

Arch Intern Med. 1969;123(1):104. doi:10.1001/archinte.1969.00300110106024

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Constructive originality is always welcome, especially in areas where well-beaten paths tend to become inescapable grooves. Internist-neurologist Collins has attempted to dramatize laboratory diagnosis in clinical medicine by creating an illustrated guide. This is a formidable undertaking since conceptual change and technical innovation tend to make textbooks about laboratory medicine anachronistic before the print is dry. Yet, this cleverly contrived book with multicolored diagrams (over 200) and terse commentaries on mechanisms emerges as a pleasant departure from the conventional. This is not a technical manual; it is not concerned with hardware and procedure.

It may seem somewhat frivolous and simplistic to the sophisticated laboratory-oriented clinician who cut his diagnostic teeth on more ponderous tomes, but it will delight the medical student and serve as a rapid refresher for the physician obliged to foray occasionally into another discipline, where the laboratory terrain is less familiar. The organization of the manual reflects

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