January 1971

internal at large medicine

Arch Intern Med. 1971;127(1):17-28. doi:10.1001/archinte.1971.00310130021002

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Discussion of hepatitis  The National Heart and Lung Institute has started free distribution of 60 liters of high titer antiserum to the Hepatitis Associated Antigen (Australia antigen). The antiserum is being distributed through the state health departments in an effort to reduce the incidence of posttransfusion hepatitis, which is the subject of the first three stories in this month's Internal Medicine at Large. One story deals with a new test; another with a method to reduce the incidence of hepatitis by washing red blood cells, and the third describes the results of a survey of blood transfusions in New Jersey.

Washed red cells  The incidence of posttransfusion hepatitis can be reduced, says a Boston hematologist, by using a special washing technique to treat previously frozen red blood cells. But he adds that his results apply only to his highly specialized procedure.James L. Tullis, MD, chairman of the Department of

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