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Article
April 1971

A STUDY OF THE MECHANISM BY WHICH EXERCISE INCREASES THE PULMONARY DIFFUSING CAPACITY FOR CARBON MONOXIDE

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, I and the Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, N. C.) (Submitted for publication October 6, 1958; accepted February 12, 1959

United States Public Health Service Postdoctorate Research Fellow.

Arch Intern Med. 1971;127(4):671-687. doi:10.1001/archinte.1971.00310160149011
Abstract

The pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL) increases with exercise. This was first shown by Krogh in 1915 (1) and has been confirmed by investigators who have studied the matter since that time, using both carbon monoxide and oxygen (2-5). The mechanism by which exercise increases the diffusing capacity is not altogether clear, however, and the apparent amount of increase with exercise is dependent on the technique used for determining the diffusing capacity, and on the severity of the exercise.

Two methods widely used for estimating the pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide are the steady state method of Filley, MacIntosh and Wright (3) and the Krogh breath holding technique as modified by Ogilvie, Forster, Blakemore and Morton (5). In the steady state technique, the subject breathes continuously throughout the test period, which makes minute ventilation a variable factor. In the breath holding method, however, the breath is held and minute

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