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September 1972

Physical Conditioning in Medical Personnel

Author Affiliations


From the departments of medicine, St. Luke's Hospital (Drs. Koepke and Luria) and Case-Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Dr. Luria), Cleveland.

Arch Intern Med. 1972;130(3):343-345. doi:10.1001/archinte.1972.03650030025006

The effects of a ten-week physical conditioning program were evaluated in a group of professional hospital personnel. Exercise sessions were held during working hours five times per week and consisted of jogging one mile in a ten-minute period. Results suggested that the program was feasible during the busy workday schedule. Lack of interest, physical impairment, and inadequate facilities, however, contributed to a 42% attrition rate. The data also indicated that definite physiological effects were obtained with these short periods of daily exercise. Mean physical working capacity increased 145 kilopond-meters (kpm)/min; maximal oxygen uptake, 4.16 ml/kg/min; and maximum voluntary ventilation, 28 liters/min. Resting mean heart rate diminished 11 beats per minute. Three risk factors of coronary heart disease, body weight and serum cholesterol and serum triglyceride values, were not altered.