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Article
July 1973

The Complete Handbook for Medical Secretaries and Assistants.

Author Affiliations

Secretary to William H. Wehrmacher, MD Chicago

Arch Intern Med. 1973;132(1):143. doi:10.1001/archinte.1973.03650070129039

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Abstract

As I began my first medical secretarial assignment fresh from school and eager to do battle against disease, my starry eyes could not see the real complexity of the job. Perhaps I could have begun my task more effectively if I had first read Dennis and Doyle's new handbook. They are certainly correct when they say: "The medical assistant/secretary occupies a position that will make heavy demands upon her character and emotional stability. In the doctor's office, emphasis is placed on intelligence, human interest, and attitude. Here, the items of daily transaction are concerned little with things but with people, and most of the business transacted is of extremely personal and confidential nature." Although the complex outline of the job described in their handbook did not frighten me into seeking other work, their publication certainly did help in getting started to understand what is really going on in the physician's

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