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Article
August 1973

Advances in Internal Medicine, vol 17.

Author Affiliations

Newton Lower Falls, Mass

Arch Intern Med. 1973;132(2):301. doi:10.1001/archinte.1973.03650080143045

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Abstract

Although I have enduring respect for the discernment of the book editor, I must confess to initial bewilderment—a not uncommon state for a thoracic surgeon—upon receiving his request to review Advances in Internal Medicine. Was it a tribute to the catholicity of my medical tastes? Or just a secretarial error? Neither, I decided, after sober reflection. For, like its predecessors, Advances is perhaps more attuned to the noninternist who wants a deeper view into what is going on in the mother specialty than it is to the seasoned practitioner of medicine. But this is not to say that any active internist will read Advances without gaining new knowledge—or, more importantly, new insights.

Indeed, in his preface to volume 15 (1969) the then-new editor signaled a change to an editorial policy directed at producing "an annual volume which every internist should read in its entirety and by so doing may continuously

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