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Article
April 1975

Chemoprophylaxis of Tuberculosis

Author Affiliations

USAF

From the Department of Medicine, the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.

Arch Intern Med. 1975;135(4):606-611. doi:10.1001/archinte.1975.00330040118020
Abstract

Myron Jacobs, MD, Fellow, Pulmonary Division, Department of Medicine, the Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, and Instructor in Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine: A 29-year-old black man was admitted to Jewish Hospital for evaluation of a cavitary pulmonary infiltrate. His present illness began at least five months prior to admission when he had fever associated with right, lower-lateral pleuritic chest pain. He was examined by a physician, given penicillin and aspirin, and seemed to improve. One month later, he had a similar episode and was seen at the Jewish Hospital emergency room where a chest x-ray film showed right hilar adenopathy and a mass in the superior segment of the right lung's lower lobe that proved to be cavitary on laminography. The patient was unavailable for follow-up until the day prior to admission when he returned to the emergency room because of epitaxis. A chest x-ray film was unchanged

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