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Article
July 1975

Whatever Happened to the "National Health Care Crisis"?

Author Affiliations

From the Center for Community Health Systems, Columbia University, New York.

Arch Intern Med. 1975;135(7):927-928. doi:10.1001/archinte.1975.00330070049007
Abstract

A front page headline in the Washington Post on March 18, 1974 informed that newspaper's readers that: "Most Are Satisfied With Medical Care." The article under the headline reported that "Washington area residents, echoing the relatively high esteem doctors enjoy throughout the country, appear to be generally satisfied with the medical care they are receiving." The article referred to a study by the Bureau of Social Research, Inc. that reported "six of every seven local residents are at least 'pretty satisfied' with their medical care and only one in 10 expressed any measure of discontent." A majority of Washington suburbanites expressed themselves "very satisfied" with the medical services available to them, and so did "two of five respondents living in the less affluent District of Columbia."

One reads this article and rereads it and wonders: Whatever happened to the national health care crisis or the national health crisis? It seems

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